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Gzip (short for GNU zip) format is an open-source compression format common on Unix systems. Gzip compresses a file's data to take up less space. Gzip files typically have names ending with the extension ".gz". Fetch can compress files with gzip when putting files, and automatically decode them when getting files.

Gzip format will only encode the data part of Macintosh files, so you should only use it for files that contain no special Macintosh information. Gzip format may be a good choice if you have large files that compress well and your target audience is Unix users. Fetch's automatic decoding or StuffIt Expander can decode gzip files on the Macintosh.

See the upload formats help topic for information about encoding files in Gzip format when uploading. You cannot set Gzip format as your default upload format

Fetch automatically recognizes and decodes Gzip files when downloading, although automatic recognition can be turned on and off by selecting a remote file whose name ends with ".gz", choosing Remote > Get Info to show the info window, and, in the Transfer Options pane, checking or unchecking the Automatically decode files like this checkbox.

Fetch automatically recognizes and decodes Gzip files when downloading, although automatic recognition can be turned on and off by either:

  • Selecting a remote file whose name ends with ".gz", choosing Remote > Get Info to show the info window, and, in the Transfer Options pane, checking or unchecking the Automatically decode files like this checkbox — this will enable or disable decoding of Gzip files but will not affect the decoding of other formats, such as Zip or StuffIt archives;
  • Or choosing Fetch > Preferences, clicking the Download tab, and checking or unchecking the Allow automatic decoding of downloaded files checkbox — this will enable or disable decoding of all file types.

For more information about using gzip in Fetch, see the StuffIt and Archive formats help topic. For more information about the gzip format in general, see the Gzip home page.

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