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can't open data connection (5 posts)

This is an archived topic. The information in it is likely to be out-of-date and no longer applicable to current versions of Fetch.
  • Started 11 years ago by PaBev
  • Latest reply 11 years ago from Jim Matthews
  • PaBev Member

    I'm using Panther OS10.3--I do have the firewall on, and now I get the message--Can't open data connection. Any suggestions?

    Posted 11 years ago #

  • Jim Matthews Administrator

    If you have the firewall on you need to check the "Use passive mode transfers (PASV)" box in the Firewall section of Fetch Preferences. Choose "Preferences..." from the Fetch menu, click on the Firewall tab, then check the box and hit OK.

    If that doesn't work your server may not support passive mode FTP. In that case you have to choose between having the OS X firewall enabled and using that server.

    Thanks,

    Jim Matthews
    Fetch Softworks

    Posted 11 years ago #

  • PaBev Member

    Thanks. I had to change the FTP services in the firewall section--to take the firewall off that. One other note--with passive mode enabled in the network proxy, I had to disable it in Fetch preferences. But now I connect.

    Posted 11 years ago #

  • PaBev Member

    But I do have a question--if i have to enable FTP in the OSX firewall software in order for Fetch to work--does that open my computer to "intruders?--exactly the reason for having a firewall. Unfortunately just enabling passive mode will not allow Fetch to work properly.

    Posted 11 years ago #

  • Jim Matthews Administrator

    The way FTP works in non-passive mode is that each time you want a file list or to transfer a file, Fetch tells the server to make a connection back to your Mac. The firewall's basic job is to stop other computers from connecting to your Mac. So there's a fundamental conflict, which is why I recommend using passive mode wherever possible.

    Since passive mode isn't an option for you, it's worth asking what you are giving up by turning off the firewall. To date I'm not aware of any common attacks against OS X that are stopped by the firewall, so I do not think you would be very vulnerable. A successful attack needs more than just an open port -- it needs some malicious or broken software running on your Mac that can be expoited from outside. I would stay up to date with security updates (in the Software Update panel of System Preferences), and not run any services that you aren't using (in the Sharing panel of System Preferences); in that situation you are fairly safe with or without the firewall.

    Jim Matthews
    Fetch Softworks

    Posted 11 years ago #

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